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Why for ultimate data centre security, technology alone is not the answer

June 21, 2018 / Arturo Maqueo
SHARESHARESHARE

The security of data – and in particular people’s personal data – has been a hot topic in recent months. The EU’s rollout of new GDPR regulations; the Cambridge Analytica scandal; or the seemingly weekly revelations of financial institutions or consumer service providers which have had their databases hacked, are all examples most of us will be aware of. Less often discussed but just as important as the security of our data, is the security of the data centres that house it. And at first glance, identifying, reviewing and prioritising all the elements that a data centre must contain in terms of security would appear to be a very complex subject, depending on myriad variables including facility size, organisation type, service commitments, system complexity, customer requirements, the list goes on… However, independent of the variables mentioned above, in my view data centre security can be boiled down to just two areas – physical security and operational security.  And while both of these clearly depend to a great extent on technology, the single most important element is the establishment of appropriate policies, processes and operating procedures – and critically, of course, actually following them. Unfortunately, over the years I have seen many examples of security – both physical and operational – being seriously compromised through the lack of clear and well-defined security processes and procedures. And ironically, I have seen this most often in data centre facilities that had state-of-the art security equipment installed. For example, implementing the latest and most sophisticated biometric access systems does not, by itself, ensure that supposedly secure areas are actually secure and that access is fully controlled. On the contrary, I have witnessed unauthorised and unsupervised personnel wander in and out of secure areas at will. The failure here not being due to any fault with the access control equipment itself but to appropriate security protocols not being implemented or maintained.