APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE

Polte and VMware To Unlock 5G Precise Positioning for Open Radio Access Networks

Polte | October 08, 2021

Polte and VMware To Unlock 5G Precise Positioning for Open Radio Access Networks
Polte, the innovator of Cloud Location over Cellular (C-LoC) technology, today announced a partnership with VMware to enable an Open Radio Access Network (Open RAN) solution for global "5G Precise Positioning," leveraging Polte as an xApp on VMware's RAN Intelligent Controller (RIC) platform. This partnership aims to address the challenges of security, accuracy, and seamless cellular continuity that previously created barriers to access for 5G Precise Positioning within use cases ranging from Industry 4.0 to 5G Critical IoT. Together, through the augmentation of Open RAN architecture, Polte and VMware endeavor to stimulate innovation while subsequently offering systems integrators more RAN vendor choice.

"Together, Polte's and VMware's 5G Precise Positioning solution aims to meet the increasing demands for enterprise security while providing accuracy down to the sub-meter level with private networks," said Stephen Spellicy, vice president of product marketing and business development, Service Provider and Edge, VMware. "We plan to unlock a plethora of new global asset tracking use cases, especially within 5G Industrial and Critical IoT."

The RIC, as introduced by the O-RAN Alliance, is a core element of Open RAN architecture that allows operators to launch and optimize new cloud-native services and xApps, uninterrupted. VMware's RIC offers a software development kit (SDK) for third parties to develop new innovative applications for Open RAN, and enables operators to seamlessly integrate such applications into their networks. It will enable Polte's location xApp to not only democratize 5G Precise Positioning, but offer a foundation for other xApps that benefit from location awareness.

Solutions providers should think of location as a system, not a feature.Taking a holistic approach to location at the earliest stages of any 5G deployment is fundamental to the success of offering value in 5G to enterprises

Polte CEO Ed Chao

As a leading provider of cellular location, Polte's domain expertise and 70 global patents and patents pending are key to unlocking the full potential of 5G positioning for enterprises. 5G allows Polte to transform the utility of cellular location, bringing the optimum level of accuracy for macro networks and 5G private networks. Polte's and VMware's Open RAN RIC-based 5G Precise Positioning solution will provide enterprises with more secure communication to all devices and to their own cloud architecture, required for the most advanced, mission-critical communications.

Polte and VMware are both contributing members of the O-RAN Alliance, as well as participants in the 5G Open Innovation Lab, a collaborative ecosystem bringing together leading enterprise partners with cutting-edge startups harnessing the power and potential of 5G and edge computing to build what's next.


About Polte:
Polte, the innovator of Cloud Location over Cellular (C-LoC) technology, provides disruptive, low-cost indoor and outdoor IoT location solutions that empower enterprises with unprecedented, real-time visibility into all the things that matter. Leveraging global 4G and 5G cellular signals, Polte transforms what is possible with asset tracking by driving heightened accessibility and greater speed to ROI for supply chain, logistics, manufacturing, and a wide range of other sectors.

Spotlight

As 5G gains momentum, many are wondering what impact it will have on the data center industry. Find out how 5G will transform data center infrastructure and how the industry will evolve to support robust network architectures and the need for.

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Spotlight

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