APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE

Movandi Demonstrates 5G mmWave Connectivity for Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything Communications

Movandi | May 25, 2021

Movandi Demonstrates 5G mmWave Connectivity for Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything Communications
Movandi, a leader of new 5G millimeter wave (mmWave) technology, revealed today the successful demonstration of mmWave repeaters, delivering on the promise of seamless 5G cellular vehicle-to-everything (C-V2X) communication for the next generation of connected vehicles. On the Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband network, a Movandi BeamXR powered mmWave repeater installed within a car allowed greater than 10x efficiency gains with an average throughput of 1.5 gigabits per second (Gbps). The test results revealed a 25X improvement in throughput over a standard 4G LTE service, and it was carried out on behalf of an industry partner.

The 5G mmWave spectrum has orders of magnitude greater efficiency than the sub-6 GHz spectrum by providing for much higher data rates and lower latency. This performance will allow the low latency and high throughput expected by sensor-laden connected cars, which generate terabytes of data for cloud-based AI systems and predictive algorithms to improve safety and collision avoidance systems.

However, as the industry transitions from 4G to 5G, many service providers see sub-6 GHz technology as the only viable 5G solution for mobile connectivity in automobiles. Higher-speed mmWave technology is believed to be too difficult to implement in fast-moving vehicles where steel and glass materials act as barriers to mmWave signal penetration. This challenge is illustrated by the short-range and lower data speeds experienced by users of 5G mmWave-enabled handsets while on the road.

Gartner predicts that the attach rate of 5G interfaces in embedded automotive telematics will rise from 0% in 2019 to 51% by 2029. The automobile industry will accelerate 5G adoption for the Internet of Things (IoT), with almost 180 million connected vehicles by 2029.

Movandi has shown that its BeamXR mmWave powered repeaters integrated into vehicles can overcome these difficulties, allowing uninterrupted ultra-wideband communications in urban areas with 5G access points spaced approximately 1,000 meters apart. Next-generation Node B (gNB) base stations are often deployed 500 meters apart in today's typical 5G coverage areas. Coverage is often restricted within a few meters of a gNB, while BeamXR-powered mmWave repeaters extend continuous coverage and have a seamless handoff between gNBs to ensure continuity. 5G connections with 1.5 Gbps data speeds can be achieved with gNBs placed farther apart (1000 meters or more) by using mmWave repeaters within vehicles, allowing operators to reduce costs by reducing the number of gNBs deployed along roadways.

If the vehicle is moving or stationary, BeamXR-powered repeaters can have uninterrupted 5G ultra-wideband coverage for end-users and edge computing systems in infotainment control panels. The repeaters collaborate with the base station to provide continuous coverage at highway speeds while completing handoffs between gNBs in sub-seconds. A single repeater can support multiple mobile phones or modems within a vehicle while also providing 5G backhaul to the cloud for self-driving cars. Movandi repeaters also help to reduce mobile phone power usage and mmWave radiation inside the vehicle.

Movandi provides full 5G mmWave reference designs, demos, and trial opportunities to customers to help them lower development costs and accelerate time to market.

About Movandi

Movandi is the fastest-growing 5G mmWave solutions company, focusing on the design and development of deep technologies for 5G and beyond, interconnecting our world and enabling AI apps to improve the lives of all humanity. Former Broadcom innovators who are RF and SoC world-recognized pioneers and visionaries, including today's top leaders in the wireless industry, founded the company. Their innovations have shaped and transformed wireless over the last few decades. Movandi, the leader of wireless RF systems, is solving real-world 5G mmWave deployments with unmatched differentiation and high-performance core technology in 5G integrated circuits, antennas, systems, algorithms, and design disciplines, enabling 5G to achieve its maximum potential. Movandi's flexible solutions solve 5G mmWave deployment cost and scheduling challenges while also providing future-proof solutions that use mesh and routing to improve 5G coverage and capacity. Movandi's robust and diverse system IP and patent portfolio powers the entire 5G ecosystem, from infrastructure to mobile, thus ensuring optimum 5G coverage.

Spotlight

As you transition to the new era of computing, flexible financing can help optimize the entire life cycle of your IT infrastructure. 10% of companies report that their IT infrastructure is fully prepared to meet the demands of mobile, social business, big data and cloud. 76% of IT decision makers are concerned by the rising pressure to reduce costs. Align your transition costs with expected benefits to better predict return on investment. Dispose of obsolete equipment. Transition to the latest technology at end of lease to meet new demands and optimize total cost of ownership.

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