Colony Capital Invests in DataBank, Has Big Plans in Digital Infrastructure

Data Center Frontier | January 09, 2020

Colony Capital Invests in DataBank, Has Big Plans in Digital Infrastructure
The investment firm Colony Capital intends to be an active player in the data center sector in 2020 and beyond. In a sign of its interest in edge computing, Colony said this week that it will invest $185 million in colocation provider DataBank, purchasing equity positions from two existing investors. The deal is part of Colony Capital’s sharpened focus on digital infrastructure. Colony is a leading example of how the data center industry has become a magnet for large global investors. The firm is selling much of its industrial real estate holdings, and reinvesting that capital in digital infrastructure, including cell towers, data centers, fiber and small cell antennas.

Spotlight

The days of cobbling together makeshift data center systems and wrestling with complex hardware, software and data integration are waning fast. Convergence is here in the form of hyper-converged and converged IT infrastructures and the benefits for your data center systems are clear. Organizations realize greater value and efficiency when deploying fully integrated compute, storage and network gear as one unit. Convergence IT infrastructure has moved far beyond simply bundling and pre-integrating a selection of different manufacturers’ data center IT systems offerings (see the chart below or download it here). Vendors from traditional IT sectors such as storage and servers or virtualization, as well as specialized companies, have embraced the notion of hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI). Vendors are competing to be the single source for all enterprise computing needs.

Spotlight

The days of cobbling together makeshift data center systems and wrestling with complex hardware, software and data integration are waning fast. Convergence is here in the form of hyper-converged and converged IT infrastructures and the benefits for your data center systems are clear. Organizations realize greater value and efficiency when deploying fully integrated compute, storage and network gear as one unit. Convergence IT infrastructure has moved far beyond simply bundling and pre-integrating a selection of different manufacturers’ data center IT systems offerings (see the chart below or download it here). Vendors from traditional IT sectors such as storage and servers or virtualization, as well as specialized companies, have embraced the notion of hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI). Vendors are competing to be the single source for all enterprise computing needs.

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Bridgecrew | June 09, 2020

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eHealth Saskatchewan | June 12, 2020

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techcrunch | April 28, 2020

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