Was Your IT Infrastructure Ready for COVID-19?

ENRICO SIGNORETTI | April 7, 2020

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Lockdowns, quarantines, travel bans, restrictions on social life and more. The world is facing one of its biggest challenges right now, something that was predicted multiple times in the past, but something no one paid much attention to until now. The impact on our future life is still up in the air, but what about IT? I have been asking clients and colleagues “What is the real impact of COVID-19 on your IT infrastructure?” for a couple of weeks now, while also trying to get a grasp on what is really happening to both IT professionals and the IT vendor community. While my focus is on data storage, I’m pretty sure that a similar analysis of other areas of IT will lead to the same conclusions. Here is a very basic example.

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TeamViewer Armenia

TeamViewer GmbH, a German company founded in 2005 and headquartered in Goppingen (near Stuttgart), engages in the development and sales of systems for web-based cooperation, communication and remote monitoring and management of workstations, servers, websites, mobile and IoT devices. A quick start and rapid growth have led to over 1.5 billion installations of the TeamViewer software in more than 200 countries around the world in just a short span of time.

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PEWC Makes Easy Transition to SAP HANA with Cisco HyperFlex

Article | April 20, 2020

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Verizon launches 5G fixed wireless in parts of 21 more cities

Article | April 20, 2020

Communications giant Verizon last week launched 5G for Business Internet in 20 new markets, targeting SMBs and enterprises alike. The fixed-wireless plans provide download speeds of 100Mbps ($69/month), 200Mbps ($99/month), and 400Mbps ($199/month) with no data limits. Upload speeds are slower. Verizon is also offering a 10-year price lock for new customers with no long-term contract required. “As 5G Business Internet scales into new cities, businesses of all sizes can gain access to the superfast speeds, low latency and next-gen applications enabled by 5G Ultra-Wideband, with no throttling or data limits,” Tami Erwin, CEO of Verizon Business, said in a statement. “We’ll continue to expand the 5G Business Internet footprint and bring the competitive pricing, capability, and flexibility of our full suite of products and services to more and more businesses all over the country.” The service was previously launched in parts of Chicago, Houston and Los Angeles. Verizon started rolling out 5G services last year using lower spectrum bands. According to a study by IHS Markit’s RootMetrics, Verizon offers speeds similar to those of T-Mobile but behind AT&T.

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Why we need more 5G cyberhacks

Article | April 20, 2020

How secure are 5G networks? That question should be on the lips of every network operator (and their customers) as the next generation of mobile broadband technology is rolled out across the world. While the industry is likely to find out the hard way, there are steps that can be taken to head off potential trouble. One such step is for network technology vendors to open up their systems to ethical hackers to see what happens (a scenario that doesn't happen nearly enough in the industry across all types of network technology). So it was encouraging to see a recent report on what was the world's first 5G cyber hackathon, which was held last November in Oulu, Finland. It was particularly encouraging to see that two of the radio access network market's leaders, Ericsson and Nokia, participated, as more than 80 ethical hackers got stuck into 5G New Radio, non-standalone (NSA) core and 5G fixed wireless access systems to see what vulnerabilities they could uncover.

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Cartesi creates Linux infrastructure for blockchain DApps

Article | April 20, 2020

DApps (sometimes called Dapps) are from the blockchain universe and so, logically, the apps part stands for application (obviously) and the D part stands for decentralised (only obvious once you know that we’re talking distributed immutable language here). According to the guides section at blockgeeks, DApps are open source in terms of code base, incentivised (in terms of who validates it) and essentially decentralised so that all records of the application’s operation must be stored on a public and decentralised blockchain to avoid pitfalls of centralisation. So then, Cartesi is a DApp infrastructure that runs an operating system (OS) on top of blockchains. The company has now launched a more complete ‘platform-level’ offering, which is described as a layer-2 solution

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Spotlight

TeamViewer Armenia

TeamViewer GmbH, a German company founded in 2005 and headquartered in Goppingen (near Stuttgart), engages in the development and sales of systems for web-based cooperation, communication and remote monitoring and management of workstations, servers, websites, mobile and IoT devices. A quick start and rapid growth have led to over 1.5 billion installations of the TeamViewer software in more than 200 countries around the world in just a short span of time.

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