Cloud computing: Five key business trends to look out for

MARK SAMUELS | December 24, 2018

article image
Cloud computing established itself in 2018 as an essential platform for many businesses looking to build innovative services. However, there's still progress to be made before the operating systems on the cloud can truly be seen as a business-as-normal activity. Will we get to that point in 2019? Five experts give their views on the key cloud trends to look out for next year. 1. PORTABILITY WILL BECOME INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT Gregor Petri, research vice president at analyst Gartner, says that as we move more things to the cloud, we become more dependent on it -- and that will bring issues through 2019 and beyond. "It's so easy to consume the cloud that people don't necessarily think about how difficult it will be to leave a provider if the business needs to," he says. Petri says many executives take it for granted that they'll be locked into a vendor for a particular part of their functionality. Yet as the cloud starts to be part of more business-critical services, many people are recognising they will need some variability, choice and an ability to switch.

Spotlight

First Focus IT

First Focus is the smart alternative IT provider for mid-sized businesses throughout Australia and New Zealand.

OTHER ARTICLES

A Cloudy Future: Data Center Demand and COVID-19

Article | April 15, 2020

COVID-19 has altered our world. In this series of stories, Data Center Frontier explores the strategic challenges the pandemic presents for the data center and cloud computing sectors as we navigate this complex new landscape. We begin with a look at how COVID-19 is impacting demand for digital infrastructure. The COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic has reinforced the importance of data centers and cloud computing for our society. In the early days of the crisis, the data center

Read More

We Need to Talk About ‘Cloud Neutrality’

Article | February 10, 2020

We spent a lot of years talking about net neutrality the idea that the companies that provide access to the internet shouldn’t unfairly block, slow down, or otherwise interfere with traffic even if that traffic competes with their services. But there’s an even bigger issue brewing, and it’s time to start talking about it: cloud neutrality. “While its name sounds soft and fluffy,” Microsoft president and general counsel Brad Smith and coauthor Carol Ann Browne write in their recent book, Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age, “in truth the cloud is a fortress.” Their introduction describes the modern marvel of the data center: a 2 million-square-foot, climate-controlled facility made up of colossal electrical generators, diesel fuel tanks, battery arrays, and bulletproof doors

Read More

Microsoft Acquires npm: A Healthy Move for Critical Public Infrastructure

Article | March 16, 2020

Today, news broke that GitHub and its parent company Microsoft, acquired npm and its public repository of open source JavaScript packages. In 2018 when Microsoft acquired Github, many in the developer community had a cautious, even emotional response. Given today’s announcement that GitHub is acquiring npm -- the same concerns are likely to surface again since JavaScript is one of the world’s most popular programming languages and since the commons of the global JavaScript community reside within the fabric of npm.

Read More

How to Decide Between a Hybrid Cloud and Multicloud Environment

Article | February 26, 2020

Judging from search engine traffic — and from the calls I receive — there’s some confusion out there about hybrid cloud and multicloud. More than once, I’ve heard the story of a technology manager’s boss returning from a conference a year or two ago raving about hybrid cloud, only now to insist that the organization needs to pursue a multicloud strategy. This rapid change in focus, combined with continued confusion over the terms themselves, is enough to make an IT professional’s head spin. In truth, hybrid cloud and multicloud (and even some combination of them) are completely viable models, with various organizations relying on each to achieve significant business benefits. But before IT and business leaders can decide which approach makes the most sense for them, they need to step back and ask themselves what outcomes they are trying to achieve.

Read More

Spotlight

First Focus IT

First Focus is the smart alternative IT provider for mid-sized businesses throughout Australia and New Zealand.

Events